Background

The Trust was founded in 1920 by Barrow Cadbury and his wife Geraldine Southall Cadbury. Barrow was the grandson of John Cadbury, the founder of the family-run chocolate business in Birmingham where Barrow worked for almost 50 years, succeeding his uncle George as Chairman in 1918. He and Geraldine were committed Quakers who chose to live modestly themselves and establish the Trust. In time, their children became Trustees and their son, Paul Cadbury, took over as Chair in 1959. Paul, his sisters and many of their descendants have all given time to being Trustees and added generously to the Trust’s endowment. The concerns of the founders and five generations of their family are still reflected in the work of the Trust today.


Mission

The Barrow Cadbury Trust’s vision is of a peaceful and equitable society, free from discrimination and based on the principle of social justice for all.
The Trust’s mission is to use all of its assets to work with others to bring about structural change for a more just and equal society.

Geographic focus

UK, particularly the West Midlands

Programme areas

The Trust has three programmes :

– Criminal justice,

– Migration,

– Economic justice,

– An additional social investment programme which operates in a different way from the other three programmes.


Criminal Justice

Through its Criminal Justice Programme, Barrow Cadbury Trust’s principal aim is to strengthen the evidence base for structural and practical change for young adults and women and increase the criminal justice system’s ability to support their rehabilitation and desistance from crime.


Migration

The aim of the migration programme is to promote an immigration system that is fair to both migrants and established residents and a policy and public debate on migration and integration that is based on shared values as well as evidence.


Economic Justice

By exploring good practice and innovation in financial systems that actively promote financial inclusion the foundation intends spread creative solutions and encourage new conversations and partnerships.


Social Investment

In 2010 the trustees decided to use part of the foundation’s endowment to further the aims of the Trust through investments in charities and social enterprises, aiming to achieve both a social and a financial return with the funds.