Background
Founded by IT entrepreneur and philanthropist Steve Killelea in 2007, the Institute for Economics and Peace is impacting traditional thinking on matters of security, defence, terrorism and development.The Institute for Economics and Peace is the world’s leading think tank dedicated to developing metrics to analyse peace and to quantify its economic value. It does this by developing global and national indices, calculating the economic cost of violence, analysing country level risk and understanding positive peace. The research is used extensively by governments, academic institutions, think tanks, non-governmental organisations and by intergovernmental institutions such as the OECD,
Mission
To create a paradigm shift in the way the world thinks about peace. THEY use data driven research to show that peace is a positive, tangible and achievable measure of human well-being and development.
Programme areas
Our four key areas of research:

- Measuring Peace :
Measuring peace at the global and national level allows us to assess the social, political and economic factors that create peace. Each year the Institute for Economics and Peace produces the Global Peace Index, the world’s leading measure of national peacefulness, ranking 163 countries according to their levels of peace. A series of national peace indices have also been developed to explore the fabric of peace at the subnational level.

- Positive Peace:
Peace is much more than the absence of violence. Positive Peace describes the attitudes, structures and institutions that underpin and sustain peaceful societies. The Institute has developed a conceptual framework, known as the Pillars of Peace, that outlines a system of eight factors that work together to build positive peace.

- Economics of Peace:
The Institute has developed an innovative methodology to calculate the economic impact of violence to the economy. It does this by calculating 13 different types of violence related spending at the national level, and applying a multiplier effect to account for the lingering influence of violence and fear.

- Risk:
Using data collected since 1996, the Institute has developed a new methodology to identify countries at risk of falling into instability and violence. The risk model allows a deep understanding of the resilience of nations towards internal and external shocks and can be used for forecasting risk and opportunity.